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Do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit, but in humility consider others better than yourselves. Each of you should look not only to your own interests, but also to the interests of others.”  (Philippians 2:3-4)

 

 

While there is no way we can eliminate entirely the possibility that members of our campus community will become ill, by being unified in true community—by being “stronger together”—we can mitigate those risks. 


 

 
Masks must be worn in indoor spaces, and outdoors when six-foot distancing cannot be maintained.

 

 

The medical community worldwide is nearly unanimous that physical (social) distancing practices and wearing masks/face coverings is the best way to slow the spread of the disease.

When physically distanced, you are not required to wear a mask in private spaces (such as offices and residence hall rooms) or while eating in common areas (Dining Commons, common areas of residence hall rooms), but masks must be worn when entering shared entry points or spaces. This is not a recommendation, but rather a requirement.

In classrooms, masks or face coverings may be removed ONLY if two conditions are met: 1) six-foot physical distancing can be maintained at all times, and 2) the professor/instructor permits their removal. To be clear, even if six-foot distancing can be maintained, masks or face coverings must be worn if the professor/instructor requires it. 

These efforts are critical as we seek to maintain the safety and well-being of our faculty, staff, and students. It also demonstrates that, as a vital part of our community, we take seriously our responsibility to serve, lead, and love others.


 

 
As you know, public health experts recommend that people maintain six-foot physical distance from others.

 

 

You’ve often heard it called “social distancing,” but we call it physical distancing because, despite the extra measures necessary, we are committed to providing as normal an experience as possible. And that includes being unified in community and spirit.

Simply put, to practice physical distancing, stay at least six feet (about two arms’ length) from other people who are not from your household or on-campus Family Group in both indoor and outdoor spaces.


 

 
One of the easiest and simplest steps you can take is to wash your hands regularly, using soap and water.

 

 

Take special care to keep your hands clean after you’ve been in public, and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing. Other times to wash include:

  • Before eating or preparing food
  • After using the restroom
  • After leaving a public place
  • After handling your cloth face covering
  • After touching animals or pets

If soap and water are not available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry, taking special care with easy-to-miss areas such as in-between and the tips of your fingers.


 

 
Another simple step you can take is to cover your coughs, sneezes, and yawns.

 

 

That being said, it’s important not to use your hands to do so; rather, use the inside of your elbow.

Even if you have no symptoms, it’s still possible to spread COVID-19 to others. Again, you should wear a mask or face covering when indoors to protect others.


 

 
If any member of the campus community—student, faculty, staff, or guest—becomes ill, it is imperative that they not come to campus.

 

 

Students who live on campus should stay in their residence hall room. Studies show COVID-19 patients who are experiencing symptoms are most contagious the day symptoms appear.

If you are a student experiencing symptoms associated with COVID-19 (including, but not necessarily limited to, fever or chills; cough; fatigue; muscle or body aches; headache; loss of taste or smell; sore throat; congestion or runny nose; nausea or vomiting; diarrhea), contact the Thrive Wellness Center at 864 -622-6078. If you are a student-athlete, contact the sports medicine department or your athletic trainer at 864-231-2144.

Faculty and staff who are experiencing symptoms should contact their healthcare provider for guidance, and notify Human Resources and their immediate supervisor. 


 

 
Thoroughly clean and disinfect your private spaces, paying special attention to commonly used items.

 

 

While Aramark (AU’s dining services provider) and the Budd Group (AU’s third-party custodial service) have robust cleaning and disinfecting procedures in place for public areas on campus, you can practice personal responsibility and demonstrate servant leadership by keeping your personal areas clean.


 

 
It’s possible to have contracted COVID-19 and not even know it—not everyone presents with symptoms.

 

 

But you should still monitor yourself closely.

That includes taking your temperature before coming to campus. We’re asking all students to bring an accurate thermometer to check for a fever, one of the most common symptoms. As a reminder, if you have a fever, it is crucial that you do not come to campus and, if you live on campus, to stay in your residence hall room. Studies show COVID-19 patients who are experiencing symptoms are most contagious the day symptoms appear.

If you are a student experiencing symptoms associated with COVID-19 (including, but not necessarily limited to, fever or chills; cough; fatigue; muscle or body aches; headache; loss of taste or smell; sore throat; congestion or runny nose; nausea or vomiting; diarrhea), contact the Thrive Wellness Center at 864 -622-6078. If you are a student-athlete, contact the sports medicine department or your athletic trainer at 864-231-2144.


 

 
Be informed!

 

 

Take advantage of the guidance of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), along with regularly visiting the Journey Ahead site for updates to campus operations and/or new policies, procedures, and protocols, along with updates to our Frequently Asked Questions.

 

The Journey Ahead is just getting started.
 

The Journey Ahead, Anderson University’s “stronger together” approach to reopening campus, is being developed by the COVID-19 Task Force and its working groups. Its protocols are based on the recommendation of public health experts and rely heavily on guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). 

Additional protocols are currently being developed, and this site is updated regularly. Please visit AU | Journey Ahead often for the latest information and guidelines, which are subject to change.