Larry Russell Knighton

Larry Russell Knighton
Assistant Professor of Education, Coordinator of Elementary Education

EdD, Doctor of Education, University of Georgia, Educational Administration
Education Specialist, Clemson University, Administration and Supervision
EdM, Master of Education, Clemson University, Administration and Supervision
BA, Bachelor of Arts, Clemson University, Elementary Education

lknighton@andersonuniversity.edu

(864) 328-1849

What classes do you teach at Anderson

Best Practices for the Elementary Classroom/Field Experience I/II, Best Practices for the Secondary Classroom/Field Experience II, Classroom Management

What year did you start teaching at AU

2007

Why teach at AU?

The ability to read scripture, share my faith with students, and pray with and for students and our country in the classroom before each class definitely sets the tone for each day. I am passionate about teaching after almost 40 years in the profession because I feel that our greatest (yet most challenging) days are yet to come.

Hobbies

Travel (Europe and particularly England), reading (particularly David Baldacci and C.S. Lewis), classical music, collecting antiques

Notable achievements outside of discipline

Attended the C.S. Lewis Summer institute, Oxbridge, in Oxford and Cambridge, England, during the summer of 2011

People might be interested to know I...

Served as a member of the Anderson School District Five School Board of Trustees in the 1980s.

How would you describe your classes to someone who has never attended one?

My classes are grounded in the practical aspects of teaching and learning, but at the same time are in step with current educational research in areas such as constructivism and pedagogy.

Publications

Knighton, Larry. 2013. The effect of principal leadership on student academic achievement. International Journal of Arts and Commerce 2 (9).

More About

As a born-again Christian, Larry views Anderson University as not merely a job, but a field of ministry. “I can literally impact hundreds of future educators who pass through my classroom.”

He believes teaching is a hard job, “but also one that has tremendous intrinsic rewards.”